Electric Vehicle terminology

Electric Vehicle terminology

Understanding EV

  • EV "Electric Vehicle" – any vehicle that uses electric motors, either in full or in part, as propulsion. This includes pure electrics, hybrids, plug-in hybrids, extended range electric vehicles and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles.
  •  Pure-Electric Vehicle (Pure-EV) – A vehicle powered solely by a battery charged from mains electricity. Currently, typical pure-electric cars have a range of approximately 100 miles but are improving all the time.
  • Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) - A vehicle with a plug-in battery and an internal combustion engine (ICE). Typical PHEVs will have a pure-electric range of over 10 miles. After the pure-electric range is utilised, the vehicle reverts to the benefits of full hybrid capability (utilising both battery power and ICE) without range compromise.
  •  Extended-Range Electric Vehicle (E-REV) – A vehicle powered by a battery with an ICE powered generator on board. E-REV’s are like pure-EV’s but with a shorter battery range of around 40 miles. Range is extended by an on board generator providing many additional miles of mobility. With an E-REV the vehicle is still always electrically driven.
  • Hybrid – A hybrid vehicle is powered by, either or both, a battery and an ICE. The power source is selected automatically by the vehicle, depending on speed, engine load and battery charge level. This battery cannot be plugged in; charge is maintained by regenerative braking supplemented by ICE generated power. A number of fuels can power hybrid ICE’s, including petrol, diesel, Compressed Natural Gas, Liquid Petroleum Gas and other alternative fuels.
  • AC "Alternating Current" – an electric current that reverses direction at regular intervals. Electric car motors are either AC or DC (see below), with most of the new breed being of AC type.
  • Charging – ’Refilling’ an electric car's battery with electricity. The time a battery takes to charge depends on the size of the battery in kWh and the amount of electric current being supplied. Electric cars can take different levels of charge, meaning they can be fast or rapid charged.
  • Charging Point – A location where electric vehicles can plugged in and charged. These can be at home, at work or in publicly accessible locations
  • DC "Direct Current" - an electric current of constant direction. Electric car motors are either DC or AC, with DC motors generally being less expensive to buy and simpler to use on an electric car.